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Major Awards for Three DCB/DBC Contributors


Congratulations to three DCB/DBC authors who have recently won prizes!

Thierry Nootens and Marc Vallières were honoured at the Institut d’histoire de l’Amérique française (IHAF) conference in Saguenay, Quebec, October 6-8.

Thierry Nootens, a professor of history in the département des sciences humaines, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, won the Guy-et-Lilianne-Frégault prize for his article “Les plaideurs en Cour supérieure, 1880-1890: classe, genre et juridicité durant la transition au capitalisme industriel.” The prize is awarded for the best article published in the last complete volume of the Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française.

Marc Vallières, an associate professor in the département des sciences historiques at the Université Laval, received the IHAF prize given by the Assemblée Nationale for a book about the political history of French America distinguished by its quality, originality, exactness, and accessibility. Mr Vallières won for his 2015 book Le Québec emprunte: syndicats financiers et finances gouvernementales, 1867-1987.

         Robert Sweeny, a professor of history at Memorial University of Newfoundland, received the 2016 Governor General’s award in history known as the Sir John A. Macdonald Prize from the Canadian Historical Association. It honours the non-fiction work of Canadian history judged to have made the most significant contribution to an understanding of the Canadian past. Professor Sweeny was presented with the award for his 2015 book Why did we choose to industrialize? Montreal, 1819-1849